Not All Who Wonder Are Lost

nevver:

Eat/Death

(Source: epentesis)

nsfw
The answer to the age old questions that most religions try to answer; where did we come from and where are we going?

nsfw

The answer to the age old questions that most religions try to answer; where did we come from and where are we going?

(Source: rauldap)

inothernews:

“I spent the entire day the building collapsed on the scene, watching as injured garment workers were being rescued from the rubble. I remember the frightened eyes of relatives — I was exhausted both mentally and physically. 
“Around 2 a.m., I found a couple embracing each other in the rubble. The lower parts of their bodies were buried under the concrete. The blood from the eyes of the man ran like a tear. 
“When I saw the couple, I couldn’t believe it. I felt like I knew them — they felt very close to me. I looked at who they were in their last moments as they stood together and tried to save each other — to save their beloved lives. 
“…This photo is haunting me all the time. If the people responsible don’t receive the highest level of punishment, we will see this type of tragedy again. There will be no relief from these horrific feelings. I’ve felt a tremendous pressure and pain over the past two weeks surrounded by dead bodies. As a witness to this cruelty, I feel the urge to share this pain with everyone. That’s why I want this photo to be seen.”

— Photographer TASLIMA AKHTER, on his photo of man and a woman discovered in a final embrace amidst the rubble of a fatal building collapse in Savar, Bangladesh.
(via Time Magazine)

inothernews:

“I spent the entire day the building collapsed on the scene, watching as injured garment workers were being rescued from the rubble. I remember the frightened eyes of relatives — I was exhausted both mentally and physically.

“Around 2 a.m., I found a couple embracing each other in the rubble. The lower parts of their bodies were buried under the concrete. The blood from the eyes of the man ran like a tear.

“When I saw the couple, I couldn’t believe it. I felt like I knew them — they felt very close to me. I looked at who they were in their last moments as they stood together and tried to save each other — to save their beloved lives.

“…This photo is haunting me all the time. If the people responsible don’t receive the highest level of punishment, we will see this type of tragedy again. There will be no relief from these horrific feelings. I’ve felt a tremendous pressure and pain over the past two weeks surrounded by dead bodies. As a witness to this cruelty, I feel the urge to share this pain with everyone. That’s why I want this photo to be seen.”

— Photographer TASLIMA AKHTER, on his photo of man and a woman discovered in a final embrace amidst the rubble of a fatal building collapse in Savar, Bangladesh.

(via Time Magazine)

When Saddam was murdered, the mainstream media broadcast it and showed the celebrations in Iraq and amongst the Iraqi diaspora. When Gaddafi was murdered, shots of his dead face were across all media platforms and a feature on the edgware road showed how much he was hated by large sections of the British Arab community.

Today, when Thatcher has died from natural causes, will they go to old industrial heartlands, South Wales, the Northeast, the Northwest, etc.? Will they show the jubilation? The celebration of a death will be cast as sickening.

I predict a moralistic sound byte from Cameron, condemning those who dance on the grave of his political hero. I don’t like celebrating death, but Thatcher lived a long life and was not murdered. She could have been.

But she lived long while millions in this world are worse off because of her government, her economics, her foreign policy. She was the head of the snake that poisoned Britain. She killed community, so if communities coalesce around her death, there’s something very good in that.

Daniel Renwick via Facebook (via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

freedominwickedness:

obentomusubi:

News of Margaret Thatcher’s death this morning instantly and predictably gave rise to righteous sermons on the evils of speaking ill of her. British Labour MP Tom Watson decreed: “I hope that people on the left of politics respect a family in grief today.” Following in the footsteps of Santa Claus, Steve Hynd quickly compiled a list of all the naughty boys and girls “on the left” who dared to express criticisms of the dearly departed Prime Minister, warning that he “will continue to add to this list throughout the day”. Former Tory MP Louise Mensch, with no apparent sense of irony, invoked precepts of propriety to announce: “Pygmies of the left so predictably embarrassing yourselves, know this: not a one of your leaders will ever be globally mourned like her.”

This demand for respectful silence in the wake of a public figure’s death is not just misguided but dangerous. That one should not speak ill of the dead is arguably appropriate when a private person dies, but it is wildly inappropriate for the death of a controversial public figure, particularly one who wielded significant influence and political power. “Respecting the grief” of the Thatcher family is appropriate if one is friends with them or attends a wake they organize, but the protocols are fundamentally different when it comes to public discourse about the person’s life and political acts. I made this argument at length last year when Christopher Hitchens died and a speak-no-ill rule about him was instantly imposed (a rule he, more than anyone, viciously violated), and I won’t repeat that argument today; those interested can read my reasoning here.

But the key point is this: those who admire the deceased public figure (and their politics) aren’t silent at all. They are aggressively exploiting the emotions generated by the person’s death to create hagiography. Typifying these highly dubious claims was this (appropriately diplomatic) statement from President Obama: “The world has lost one of the great champions of freedom and liberty, and America has lost a true friend.” Those gushing depictions can be incredibly consequential, as it was for the week-long tidal wave of unbroken reverence that was heaped on Ronald Reagan upon his death, an episode that to this day shapes how Americans view him and the political ideas he symbolized. Demanding that no criticisms be voiced to counter that hagiography is to enable false history and a propagandistic whitewashing of bad acts, distortions that become quickly ossified and then endure by virtue of no opposition and the powerful emotions created by death. When a political leader dies, it is irresponsible in the extreme to demand that only praise be permitted but not criticisms.

Bolded emphasis mine.

Thatcher literally built her entire career around a complete lack of human compassion, to the point of gleefully supporting the genocidal Khmer Rouge in Cambodia even after they had been defeated by Vietnamese intervention and there was little to no political benefit in supporting them. There can be no room in the heart of any decent person for the slightest ounce of compassion for such a monster, any more than there can be sympathy for the likes of Hitler, Stalin, or Thatcher’s bestest buddy Pol Pot.

In short, respectful silence is a social courtesy, not a moral duty. The likes of Thatcher merit no such courtesy, for they are utterly devoid of even the slightest semblance of honor.

(Source: didriksha-mani)

Letters From Kids To God

She prayed for a puppy

(Source: showslow)

mohandasgandhi:


dank-potion:

23andchildfree:

Happy women’s day, yo

What’s misandry, again?

Women perform 66% of the world’s work, but receive only 11% of the world’s income, and own only 1% of the world’s land.
Women make up 66% of the world’s illiterate adults.
Women head 83% of single-parent families. The number of families nurtured by women alone doubled from 1970 to 1995 (from 5.6 million to 12.2 million).
Women account for 55% of all college students, but even when women have equal years of education it does not translate into economic opportunities or political power.
There are six million more women than men in the world.
Two-thirds of the world’s children who receive less than four years of education are girls. Girls represent nearly 60% of the children not in school.
Parents in countries such as China and India sometimes use sex determination tests to find out if their fetus is a girl. Of 8,000 fetuses aborted at a Bombay clinic, 7,999 were female.
Wars today affect civilians most, since they are civil wars, guerrilla actions and ethnic disputes over territory or government. 3 out of 4 fatalities of war are women and children.
Rape is consciously used as a tool of genocide and weapon of war. Tens of thousands of women and girls have been subjected to rape and other sexual violence since the crisis erupted in Darfur in 2003. There is no evidence of anyone being convicted in Darfur for these atrocities.
About 75% of the refugees and internally displaced in the world are women who have lost their families and their homes.
Gender-based violence kills one in three women across the world and is the biggest cause of injury and death to women worldwide, causing more deaths and disability among women aged 15 to 44 than cancer, malaria, traffic accident, and war.
[source]

mohandasgandhi:

dank-potion:

23andchildfree:

Happy women’s day, yo

What’s misandry, again?

  • Women perform 66% of the world’s work, but receive only 11% of the world’s income, and own only 1% of the world’s land.
  • Women make up 66% of the world’s illiterate adults.
  • Women head 83% of single-parent families. The number of families nurtured by women alone doubled from 1970 to 1995 (from 5.6 million to 12.2 million).
  • Women account for 55% of all college students, but even when women have equal years of education it does not translate into economic opportunities or political power.
  • There are six million more women than men in the world.
  • Two-thirds of the world’s children who receive less than four years of education are girls. Girls represent nearly 60% of the children not in school.
  • Parents in countries such as China and India sometimes use sex determination tests to find out if their fetus is a girl. Of 8,000 fetuses aborted at a Bombay clinic, 7,999 were female.
  • Wars today affect civilians most, since they are civil wars, guerrilla actions and ethnic disputes over territory or government. 3 out of 4 fatalities of war are women and children.
  • Rape is consciously used as a tool of genocide and weapon of war. Tens of thousands of women and girls have been subjected to rape and other sexual violence since the crisis erupted in Darfur in 2003. There is no evidence of anyone being convicted in Darfur for these atrocities.
  • About 75% of the refugees and internally displaced in the world are women who have lost their families and their homes.
  • Gender-based violence kills one in three women across the world and is the biggest cause of injury and death to women worldwide, causing more deaths and disability among women aged 15 to 44 than cancer, malaria, traffic accident, and war.

[source]

(Source: stfuconservatives)

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