Not All Who Wonder Are Lost

ohstarstuff:

Be one with the Milky Way.
(Photography credit: Callum Hayton)

There is no ‘up’

jtotheizzoe:

sagansense:

listen to carl poetically remind you of where everything came from

Never forget.
hellasinhabitants:

Andromeda ☆ Ανδρομέδα
Composition Photo by Kosmas Gazeas, from the painter French Paul Gustave Dore and astrophotographer Robert Gendler
Σύνθεση φωτογραφιών του Κοσμά Γαζέα από το ζωγράφo French Paul Gustave Dore και τον αστροφωτογράφο Robert Gendler.

hellasinhabitants:

Andromeda ☆ Ανδρομέδα

Composition Photo by Kosmas Gazeas, from the painter French Paul Gustave Dore and astrophotographer Robert Gendler

Σύνθεση φωτογραφιών του Κοσμά Γαζέα από το ζωγράφo French Paul Gustave Dore και τον αστροφωτογράφο Robert Gendler.

(Source: hellas-inhabitants)

sagansense:

We have taken pictures of sunspots on Betelgeuse! 
Of course, the star doesn’t look like the illustration here but that is the picture of the sunspots (just over-layed onto the art). The images were taken in infrared by the IOTA interferometer in Arizona and you can see how big the sunspots are compared to the star itself. When you compare that to our puny solar system you can start to understand how large the star actually is. Just one of the spots is the distance Earth is from the Sun! The full illustration of Betelgeuse by ESO shows a huge plume of gas being ejected from Betelgeuse that reaches out to the orbit of Neptune. The star is losing a lot of material and is shrouded in these plums and it is contracting and expanding as it gives its last breaths. So measuring the exact size is difficult. But one thing is for sure, it is on the verge of exploding, but “on the verge” in stellar time scales means it will go supernova sometime within the next million years or so.
We have seen another star with huge sunspots as well, HD 12545.Source: Astronomy Now

via the-science-llama

sagansense:

We have taken pictures of sunspots on Betelgeuse!

Of course, the star doesn’t look like the illustration here but that is the picture of the sunspots (just over-layed onto the art). The images were taken in infrared by the IOTA interferometer in Arizona and you can see how big the sunspots are compared to the star itself. When you compare that to our puny solar system you can start to understand how large the star actually is. Just one of the spots is the distance Earth is from the Sun! The full illustration of Betelgeuse by ESO shows a huge plume of gas being ejected from Betelgeuse that reaches out to the orbit of Neptune. The star is losing a lot of material and is shrouded in these plums and it is contracting and expanding as it gives its last breaths. So measuring the exact size is difficult. But one thing is for sure, it is on the verge of exploding, but “on the verge” in stellar time scales means it will go supernova sometime within the next million years or so.

We have seen another star with huge sunspots as well, HD 12545.
Source: Astronomy Now

via the-science-llama

sagansense:

Hidden Costs Series: Light Pollution
Light pollution can be a hazard to our health. Just about every organism on the planet lives its life according to the rhythms of daytime and darkness. Excessive light can cause several human health problems — from chronic fatigue and migraines to sexual dysfunction — have also been linked to high-levels of light exposure.

(Source: astrodidact)

thesciencellama:

Neil deGrasse Tyson lays down some cold hard truth.Every second our Sun releases energy equivalent to about 1 Billion (1,000,000,000) nuclear bombs, and we are digging in the sand.

thesciencellama:

Neil deGrasse Tyson lays down some cold hard truth.
Every second our Sun releases energy equivalent to about 1 Billion (1,000,000,000) nuclear bombs, and we are digging in the sand.

simplyspace:

Multi-dimensional and elastic space.
“There are an infinite number of perspectives, all relative. Sometimes to truly see you must be close; at other times far away; still other times in between. Sometimes you must be above; sometimes below; sometimes at the same level. Space is multi-dimensional and elastic. It can be tiny or huge or any size at all, but, like awareness, it is always open and welcoming.”
— Santosh Roy

simplyspace:

Multi-dimensional and elastic space.

“There are an infinite number of perspectives, all relative. Sometimes to truly see you must be close; at other times far away; still other times in between. Sometimes you must be above; sometimes below; sometimes at the same level. Space is multi-dimensional and elastic. It can be tiny or huge or any size at all, but, like awareness, it is always open and welcoming.”

— Santosh Roy

sagansense:

Unraveling the Secrets of Type Ia Supernovae: a New Two-Minute Thesis

The folks over at PHD Comics have put together a new video in their Two-Minute Thesis series, this one featuring Ph.D candidate Or Graur of the University of Tel Aviv and the American Museum of Natural History discussing the secret lives — and deaths — of astronomers’ “standard candles” of universal distance, Type Ia supernovae.

Judging distances across intergalactic space isn’t easy, so in order to figure out how far away galaxies are astronomers have learned to use the light from Type Ia supernovae, which flare up with the brilliance of 5 billion Suns… and rather precisely so.

Type Ia supernovae are thought to be created from a pairing of two stars: one super-dense white dwarf which draws in material from a binary companion until a critical mass — about 40% more mass than the Sun – is reached. The overpacked white dwarf suddenly undergoes a rapid series of thermonuclear reactions and explodes in an incredibly bright outburst of material and energy.

But exactly what sorts of stellar pairs lead to Type Ia supernovae and how frequently they occur aren’t known, and that’s what Ph.D candidate Or Graur is aiming to learn more about.

“We don’t really know what kind of star it is that leads to these explosions, which is kind of embarrassing,” says Graur. “The companion star could be a regular star like our Sun, a red giant or supergiant, or another white dwarf.”

Because stars age at certain rates, by looking deeper into space with the Hubble and Subaru telescopes Graur hopes to determine how often and when in the Universe’s history Type Ia supernovae occur, and thus figure out what types of stars are most likely responsible.

“My rate measurements favor a second white dwarf as the binary companion,” Graur says, “but the issue is far from settled.”

Watch the video for the full story, and visit PHD TV/PHD Comics for more great science illustrations.

Video: PHDComics. Animation: Jorge Cham. Series Producer: Meg Rosenburg. Inset image: merging white dwarfs causing a Type Ia supernova. (NASA/CXC/M Weiss)

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